Category Archives: easy to make

Queen Elizabeth

 

qe1.jpg

It takes just two words to make the 52 Cocktails crew very, very happy but, surprisingly, those two words are not ‘free cocktails’. No, the magic words are ‘The Everleigh’. The Everleigh is our bar of choice in Melbourne, but we won’t bore you with the ever-growing list of reasons why. Just go there, and revel in the old-world-yet-unpretentious atmosphere, the table service that makes you feel like you’re the most important person in the room, the glorious displays of vintage cocktail shakers and vintage cocktail books (drool) and, of course, the ridiculously good, meticulously well-made cocktails. Basically, it’s heaven. (And if we ever hear the words ‘free cocktails’ and ‘The Everleigh’ in the one sentence, we’ll know we’ve died and gone to heaven!)
On a recent visit we tried a Queen Elizabeth cocktail and it was so delicious and sophisticated that we decided to try to recreate it at home. Two recipes with the same name appear in The Savoy Cocktail Book (just one of the many on display at The Everleigh, and the subject of a recent meeting of the bar’s Vintage Cocktail Book Club. Yes. This bar is so cool it has a book club dedicated to vintage cocktail books. If you have even a passing interest in books, cocktails or drinking and a fun night out, I highly recommend you attend a meeting.) One Queen Elizabeth recipe calls for curacao, vermouth and brandy; we made the other version, as follows.  It’s light and refreshing yet complex and herbaceous – more so when it’s made by a bartender at The Everleigh.

QUEEN ELIZABETH

As with most of the recipes in the fabulous Savoy Cocktail Book, this one is light on instructions, so we’ve taken the liberty of adding our own (in parentheses).

INGREDIENTS

1 dash absinthe (we used this to rinse the glass, though the original instructions indicate you just add it to the shaker along with everything else)

1/4 lemon juice (we used 15ml)

1/4 Cointreau (we used 15ml)

1/2 dry gin (we used 30ml Bombay Sapphire)

GLASS

Chilled cocktail glass

METHOD

Shake all ingredients with ice (unless you’ve already used the absinthe to rinse the glass) and strain into glass.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Easy – but even easier, and most definitely more refined and delicious, if you simply order one at the Everleigh.

RECIPE BY

This version appears in The Savoy Cocktail Book by Harry Craddock (first published 1930 by Constable & Co; this edition published 1987 by Spring Books), with additional instructions by the 52 Cocktails crew.

PS No, this article was NOT sponsored by The Everleigh. Though if they feel like it they are welcome to…

Tagged , ,

Hendrick’s Mojito

HM 01

What’s fresh and sassy and always looks good? Apart from the 52 Cocktails crew, that is? I’ll give you a clue: they’re in the photo above. Yep, it’s The Fashionable Cocktail by Jane Rocca (Hardie Grant Books 2013), which contains the recipe for the mighty fine Hendrick’s Mojito. Gorgeously illustrated by Neryl Walker, this little tome is tres chic, dahling, and features a mix of new cocktails and updated classics. In my ongoing bid to convert some gin-hating friends into liking the sacred spirit (I know, I know, how are we even friends, right?), I hit em with the Hendrick’s Mojito and they loved it. You will too.

HENDRICK’S MOJITO

This is a refreshing, moreish drink, the kind that’s all too easy to knock back. Hendrick’s gin is made with cucumber and rose petals, giving it a softer flavour than other gin, and the cucumber flavour plays nicely with the mint in this drink. The original recipe calls for a Collins glass but I used rocks glasses to avoid diluting all the dee-lish flavours too much. Go with whatever version you think you’ll like best.

INGREDIENTS

45ml Hendrick’s gin

1/2 lime

20ml lime juice

15ml sugar syrup

mint leaves

soda

cucumber slice, to garnish (optional)

GLASS

Collins or rocks

METHOD

Muddle the lime half and about 10 mint leaves in the base of the glass. Don’t be too rough; you want to release the flavour, not pound them into oblivion. Add enough ice to fill the glass at least halfway. Add the Hendrick’s, lime juice and sugar syrup and stir. Top with soda. Garnish with a cucumber slice if you wish.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

The hardest thing about making this drink is trying to resist making another 10 or so and devouring them all.

RECIPE BY

This recipe appears in The Fashionable Cocktail by Jane Rocca (Hardie Grant Books 2013).

Tagged , , ,

New Orleans Cocktail

no1

New Orleans is known for its wild nightlife, live music scene and spicy cuisine, none of which are reason enough for the 52 Cocktails crew to visit. Nope, the thing that most attracts us to Nola is, of course, its cocktails: it’s the birthplace of the Sazerac, home to the Hurricane and the proud host of the annual Tales of the Cocktail festival, in which bartenders, cocktail experts and people who work in the spirits industry gather for five days of drinking (and workshops and classes, most of which also involve drinking) before queuing up for new livers. We’re determined to get there one day; in the meantime we’re going to drink this New Orleans Cocktail, which tastes a bit like a Sazerac without the absinthe – strong, and heavy on the Peychaud’s, the bitters invented by a New Orleans apothecary.

INGREDIENTS

2 ounces bourbon

3 dashes Peychaud’s bitters

2 dashes orange curacao

lemon peel, to garnish (optional)

GLASS

Cocktail glass

METHOD

Place all ingredients (except garnish) into a mixing glass that’s half-full of ice and stir well. Strain into the chilled glass, garnish and serve.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Obtaining the ingredients is the hardest part – in Australia, it’s not easy to find Peychaud’s at the shops. We recommend you buy it online from Only Bitters.

RECIPE BY

This recipe appears in The Craft of the Cocktail by Dale DeGroff (Clarkson Potter, 2002).

Tagged ,

The Bitter Mandarin

BM2

It probably says a lot about me that in the dead of winter I still have a bottle of uni-student-budget-friendly Moscato handy.

Yep, it says that I am prepared for any drink-making eventuality, including the one where I make a really bitter drink by accident and realise it can only be saved by something sweet and fizzy. Never mind that it also says I am so disorganised that I totally forgot to drink all the Moscato in summer (when it would have been added to a shot of peach or apricot nectar in a cheap imitation of a Bellini) because it was buried beneath all the bottles of gin.

Anyway, it proved useful today when I was craving something citrus-y and had a few mandarines and some Cointreau Noir hanging around (as you do).

Side note: just as you say tomato and I say Bloody Mary, some people say mandarines and some people say mandarins. In reference to the fruit, I’ve always said mandarines, while 52 Cocktails’ CTO (Cocktail Tasting Officer) has always said mandarin. To me, a mandarin is a Chinese bureaucrat, or a type of collar on typical Chinese clothing, or a reference to the Mandarin Chinese language, while a mandarine is smallish orange-coloured citrus fruit with a thin, easy-to-peel skin, a refreshing fragrance and segmented, juicy innards. And since I am in charge of this write-up and the CTO isn’t, well, what I say goes. So if I say mandarine I mean the fruit, and if I say mandarin I mean, well, mandarin.

So, as I was saying, I had some ingredients on hand and combined them, and the result is the Bitter Mandarin.

Yes, Mandarin. Because this drink is quite bitter, and contains mandarines, and so it seemed logical enough to call it the Bitter Mandarine but more catchy to call it the Bitter Mandarin so people drinking it would think of some cross bureaucrat drinking the concoction after a long day full of red tape and a lack of stationery. Really, a bitter Mandarin would be much like a modern-day office worker but in better clothes. Or it would be like this:

THE BITTER MANDARIN

INGREDIENTS

2 small mandarines

1 sugar cube

2-3 dashes Fee Brothers Aztec Chocolate Bitters (if you are in Australia, they are available here: http://www.onlybitters.com/fee-brothers/)

60ml Cointreau Noir

Moscato, to top up

GLASS

Martini/cocktail glass

METHOD

Feeling bitter? Work pissing you off, bureaucrat? Then chop the mandarines into quarters, chuck em in the glass part of a Boston shaker, add a sugar cube and the bitters and muddle the hell out of them. Add the Cointreau Noir and half-fill with ice. Shake with rage and then double-strain into the glass. (To double strain, fit a hawthorne strainer into the shaker and place a tea strainer over the glass. As you pour through the hawthorne strainer into the tea strainer, you’ll be double-straining. It’s just like when your boss asks you to meet this week’s deadline as well as next week’s, but needs everything done yesterday… a LOT of straining.) Top with Moscato (you might need quite a lot to sweeten it to your liking.)

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Ah, the stress relief that comes with bashing the sh*t out of a helpless piece of fruit – er, I mean, this one’s easy.

RECIPE BY

This one was invented by 52 Cocktails.

TASTES LIKE

Well, that depends on who you ask. I’d say it tastes bitter (from the mandarine peel, not the bitters themselves), and mandarine-y. A bit like an Asian digestif. The CTO says it’s like a palate-cleansing sorbet and claims, “It’s not bitter at all, but then I’ve been drinking wine all night, so…” We agree that it does not taste like there’s any alcohol involved (which some people might say is the sign of a good cocktail) but suggest you do not serve it to under-18s just in case.

It

Tagged , , ,

Baldilocks and the three Caipirinhas: a 52 Cocktails experiment

IMG_3656Once upon a time there was a man with no hair called Baldilocks who was also known as the 52 Cocktails’ CTO (Cocktail Tasting Officer). One day Baldilocks went out to gather flowers for his mother and came home with a big bunch of mint and some juicy limes. “I suck at picking flowers,” sighed Baldilocks. “And whatever am I going to do with all these limes?”

Just as Balidlocks began juicing limes by smashing them repeatedly into his forehead, 52 Cocktails’ CEO (Cocktail Experimentation Officer) came home. “I don’t know what to do with all this sugar,” she said, unpacking a bag of brown sugar (not the kind favoured by the Rolling Stones), a bag of caster sugar and a bag of organic rapadura sugar. “I met with a publishing company today who said they might be interested in turning 52 Cocktails into a cocktail book. They said they couldn’t pay much but that they’d try to sweeten the deal. I didn’t think they’d mean it literally!”

She turned to look at Baldilocks, who had a rather sour expression. “What’s that look for?” she asked.

“I can’t help it,” Baldilocks said. “All the lime juice keeps getting in my eyes.” He indicated the pile of citrus and mint on the bench, which rather conveniently was sitting next to a bottle of cachaca. This gave the CEO an idea.

“Oh Baldilocks,” the CEO sighed, “why don’t you out for a walk and when you come back I’ll have something smooth and juicy for you to slip into.”

Baldilocks left hastily, and while he was out the CEO prepared herself for a three-way.

A Caipirinha prepared three different ways, that is, in order to discover which one they liked best. What, were you expecting some kind of kinky sex story? This is 52 Cocktails, not 52 Cock Tales!

First she made her standard, tried-and-true Caipirinha, using a recipe she’d adapted from Shaken: 250 very sexy cocktails (Murdoch Books, 2004).


CAIPIRINHA (aka 52 Cocktails’ house Caipirinha)

Brazil’s national drink is simultaneously sweet, sour and strong. On a hot day, with a squirt of soda water and some mint added, it’s a refreshing thirst-quencher.

INGREDIENTS

6-8 mint leaves

1 lime, chopped in half, then each half into quarters

3 teaspoons caster sugar

15 ml sugar syrup

ice cubes

60ml cachaca (she used the Sagatiba brand)

30ml soda water

GLASS

Old-fashioned

METHOD

Muddle the mint, lime, sugar and sugar syrup in an old-fashioned glass. Add several ice cubes and the cachaca and stir until ice-cold. Top with soda water and serve.

NOTES

– The above recipe is for a 52 Cocktails house Caipirinha; true Caipirinhas are not usually made this way. The method given in the book is to muddle the lime, sugar and syrup in a cocktail shaker, add ice and cachaca, shake and strain into a chilled glass and garnish with a sprig of mint. Note that soda is not usually added if you’re using this method, and the mint is not muddled along with the lime. Try making one of each style and see which you prefer – let us know in the comments section below!

– If you are trying the 52 Cocktails house Caipirinha recipe, you can add more or less mint and more or less soda water, to taste. 52 Cocktails would usually add enough soda water to top up the glass.


Next, she made two Caipirinhas based on the recipe in The Craft of the Cocktail by the legendary Dale De Groff (Clarkson Potter, 2002), using brown sugar in one and rapadura (unrefined cane sugar with a caramelly flavour) in the other.


INGREDIENTS

6-8 mint leaves

1/2 lime, quartered

1 teaspoon brown/rapadura sugar

60ml cachaca

30ml soda water

GLASS

Old-fashioned

METHOD

Muddle the mint, lime and sugar in an old-fashioned glass. Add several ice cubes and the cachaca and stir until ice-cold. Top with soda water and serve.

NOTES

Dale De Groff’s recipe is quite different, but for the sake of the experiment 52 Cocktails had to make each drink using much the same ingredients and method. Dale’s recipe does not include mint or soda, and it uses brown sugar (not rapadura). His method is as follows:

Chill a rocks glass with cracked ice. Muddle the lime and syrup in a mixing glass and add the cachaca. Dump the ice from the rocks glass into the mixing glass and shake well. Pour the entire contents of the mixing glass into the rocks glass and serve.


Because this was turning into a scientific experiment that just happened to look like an excuse to drink three cocktails on a school night, the CEO labelled each drink using a very scientific method, ie by writing what type of sugar was in each drink on a rubber band and placing it around the relevant glass. “Genius!” she exclaimed. OK, OK, she might have had a few too taste tests along the way, but let’s not hold that against her.

When Baldilocks returned he found the three drinks lined up on the bench. First he tried the rapadura Caipirinha.

“Erk,” said Baldilocks eloquently. “Why is this so dry? Where’s the flavour I know and love?”

Next he tried the brown sugar Caipirinha.

“Ooh,” said Baldilocks. “It’s not as sweet as the house style Caipirinhas. But that allows the flavour of the cachaca to come through; that slightly petrol-y, slightly earthy, entirely delicious flavour. I like this one.”

Then he tried the house style Caipirinha.

“Oh!” said Baldilocks in shock. “I thought this would be my favourite, since it’s the one we always drink. But it’s so, SO sweet! It’s like drinking liquid lime icing! It’s delicious, but I can barely taste the cachaca and it makes my teeth hurt.”

He tried them all again before giving his final verdict.

“I like the brown sugar one best, though it could do with some more lime. It tastes like what a local would get in Brazil, whereas the house style one tastes like what the tourists would drink. The rapadura one is too dry and tastes sort of burnt.” He paused, thinking. “A drink that was in between the brown sugar one and the house Caipirinha would be really good,” he hinted subtly.

He tried them all again to be sure, even drinking the one he liked least, and then, not surprisingly, he need a little lie down. So he made his way into the bedroom – and in walked three bears. And not the kind from a fairy tale, either. Boy, was Baldilocks in for a surprise!

Tagged , ,

New 1920 Cocktail

n2

I’ve often thought it would be great to travel back to the 1920s. All those glamorous cocktail parties! Flapper dresses! Racy new dances! Men in dapper suits! Sneaking into speakeasies past midnight! It’d be absolutely copacetic!

At least, that’s what history’s rose-tinted glasses would have you believe. And yet the 1920s were also when Prohibition kicked in and the Wall Street crash led to the Great Depression.

Maybe it’s best to revisit the past via a cocktail book instead; it’s cheaper, and doesn’t rely on having a time machine, for a start. Plus, it gives me a great excuse to show off one of my best-ever op shop finds: a copy of The Savoy Cocktail Book, bought for $2 in near-mint condition and now very much a prized possession. I’ve read so much about this book in other cocktail books, and now that I have a copy (and did I mention it was only $2?) I can see why. It’s beautifully illustrated, many of the recipes are classics that bars are still serving today (though I do wonder about some of the measurements, as some recipes call for ‘a glass of gin’), and the writing is refreshing and lively, just as a good cocktail should be. In short, if you ever see a copy, BUY IT – especially if it’s only $2 – and let it transport you to another era.

NEW 1920 COCKTAIL

Presumably this cocktail, which is basically a riff on a Manhattan with rye and orange bitters, was created in the 1920s; there’s no preamble to the recipe in The Savoy Cocktail Book. And yet, here in Australia, orange bitters have only become widely available in the past few years, as far as I know. Interesting, thinking a recipe that was served at the Savoy Hotel in London in the 1920s could only be easily made in Australia post-2000. What the hell else has the land Down Under been missing out on for all these years?! It’s enough to drive me to drink! Luckily, the New 1920 Cocktail is at hand…

The Savoy Cocktail Book lists the recipe as follows:

1 dash orange bitters

1/4 French vermouth

1/4 Italian Vermouth

1/2 Canadian Club whisky

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

52 Cocktails interpreted this as:

INGREDIENTS

1 dash orange bitters (we used Angostura orange bitters)

15ml Noilly Prat

15ml Cinzano Rosso

30ml Wild Turkey Rye whisky (as we didn’t have any Canadian Club, and they’re both rye-based so we figured it’d be OK)

GLASS

Cocktail

METHOD

Half-fill a cocktail shaker with ice. Add all ingredients and shake it, hard. As The Savoy Cocktail Book‘s author Harry Craddock says in the foreword, ‘Shake the shaker as hard as you can: don’t just rock it: you are trying to wake it up, not send it to sleep!’

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Now that Angostura Orange Bitters are stocked at most Dan Murphy’s stores, this one’s a doozy.

RECIPE BY

This recipe is from The Savoy Cocktail Book by Harry Craddock (first published 1930 by Constable & Co; this edition published 1987 by Spring Books)

Tagged , , ,

Bourbon Triple Sour

TBS 1

Some cocktails last through the ages; others die out like the dinosaurs. I’m hoping the Bourbon Triple Sour is in the former category.

The clue is in the title; it’s got bourbon in it, and it’s sour. But it’s a balanced sourness that’s offset by the bourbon’s caramel-ness; and with a gentle orange flavour tying it all together, it’s sort of like drinking citrus cordial for adults. It’s refreshing and tart and tastes way better than it sounds – try it.

INGREDIENTS

30ml bourbon (I used Hogs 3 Bourbon)

30ml triple sec (I used the Marie Brizard brand)

30ml lemon juice

5ml sugar syrup

GLASS

Old-fashioned

METHOD

Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker that’s half-full of ice. Shake it. Shake it more. Harder. Keep shaking. OK, you’re done. Strain into a glass that’s half-full of ice. Garnish with a lemon wedge. (The original recipe calls for a cherry and a slice of orange AND a slice of lemon as a garnish. If you want a fruit salad in your face while you’re drinking. go for it.)

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Maybe one degree, since you have to squeeze a lemon. Can you have one degree of difficulty? Gah, I don’t know, I’m not a mathematician.

RECIPE BY

This recipe appears in The Cocktail Bible by Steve Quirk (New Holland Publishers, 2010).

NOTE

One of the good things about this recipe is it doesn’t try to be high-fallutin’. There’s no requirement that you use top-notch bourbon, and it actually calls for triple sec instead of Cointreau (yes, I know the two are different things and have their own qualities, and I know triple sec is pretty damn good in a cocktail, but I’m a snob and still think Cointreau is better). While I’m tempted to try making this drink using, say, Buffalo Trace bourbon and Cointreau, I’m not sure there’s any point – it’s great just as it is. One day I’ll do an A-B test and find out which one is best – it’s a dirty job, but someone’s gotta do it. If you’ve already conducted such a scientific experiment, please let me know the results in the comment section below. Cheers!

PHOTO CREDIT

Gertrude the dinosaur appears courtesy of Make it Wednesday: https://www.facebook.com/MakeitWednesday

Tagged , , ,

Femme Fatale

WL1

If a White Lady (that’s Cointreau, lemon juice and gin) were a person, she’d be a bit like Cinderella; elegant, understated and mysterious, the kind of lady who leaves you wanting more when she disappears at midnight.

If a Femme Fatale (that’s a twist on the White Lady, using Cointreau Noir instead of Cointreau) were a person, she’d be just like a White Lady. Except she’d kill you with her bare, manicured hands before she disappeared at midnight.

FEMME FATALE

INGREDIENTS

30ml gin

15ml Cointreau Noir

15ml lemon juice

GLASS

Cocktail glass, or the most elegant glass you’ve got

METHOD

Add all ingredients to a shaker that’s half-full of ice. Shake hard, then strain into the glass.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Easy to love, but be warned; it’s a killer in disguise.

RECIPE BY

The Femme Fatale was created by the 52 Cocktails team. It’s based on the version of a White Lady that appears in Margaret Fulton’s Book of Cocktails & Party Drinks (Octopus Books, 1984).

Tagged , ,

Old Pal

OP2

‘I say, Old Pal, how about a cocktail?’

‘Why certainly, but don’t Hogg the recipe book – pass it to Maureen so she can fix us a drink, quicksticks!’

Hello and welcome to the 1950s, when men chortled down the phone while secretaries made them such drinks as the Old Pal and workplaces, as a result, were almost enjoyable places. That’s the vibe I got when I tried the Old Pal, anyhow – with its rye whiskey kick and the bitter orange overtones of Campari, it seemed like the kind of old-school drink Don Draper would have for breakfast. Then again there are plenty of things Don Draper would have for breakfast, including his secretaries, so maybe that’s not the best way to judge a cocktail…

Anyway, where was I? Oh yes. Although I’m not a Campari fan I am determined to work out why other people are, and when I stumbled across this drink in a vintage cocktail book I thought it’d be worth a go. Containing rye whiskey, dry vermouth and Campari, the Old Pal is a perverted version of the Negroni, which contains gin, sweet vermouth and Campari. And that’s what it tastes like, too; like a watered-down version of a Negroni, even though you’d think the rye whiskey in the Old Pal would have a stronger flavour than the gin in a Negroni. It’s kind of boring, the sort of thing you drink just to get drunk. It’s the kind of drink that makes you realise why Negronis are still popular when Old Pals have fallen out of favour. It’s the kind of drink that could almost – almost – make me appreciate a Negroni, and that’s saying something.

‘I suppose it’s all about the delights of subtlety and nuance in a Negroni, as opposed to the straight-shooting ‘down the hatch, that’s the stuff’ of an Old Pal, Old Pal.’

‘Damn straight. Now let’s visit the Members Club and see if someone wants to taste your Old Pal, you don’t get much more subtle than that.’

Chortle.

OLD PAL

INGREDIENTS

Equal parts rye whiskey, dry vermouth and Campari. We used:

30ml Wild Turkey rye whiskey

30ml Noilly Prat

30ml Campari

GLASS

Old-fashioned

METHOD

Stir all ingredients together in a mixing glass that’s half-full of ice. When it’s ice-cold (place the inside of your wrist on the outside of the glass to check, or just taste-test), strain into the old-fashioned glass and serve.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

How would I know, I got the secretary to make it.

RECIPE BY

This version appears in Cocktails and Mixed Drinks by Anthony Hogg (Optimum Books, 1981).

Tagged , , ,

Between the Sheets

BTS 1

As a long-time fan of Aussie cooking icon Margaret Fulton, I can understand why people would want to get her between the sheets. She’s vivacious yet well-balanced and so retro that she’s cool again – just like the Between the Sheets cocktail we made from her 1984 cocktail book, pictured above. Most recipes for this elegant drink call for light (white) rum, but this one specifies dark rum. The 52 Cocktails team used a spiced dark rum, tried it out on a guest drink taster and elicited the following review:

52 Cocktails: So what do you think?

Guest Taster: Ooh. That’s delicious.

52 Cocktails: What are the nuances of this cocktail that you’re enjoying?

Guest Taster: Nuances? You’re asking me for nuances when I’ve been drinking all day? Ack. (Pause) OK, let’s see. Nothing really stands out, because it’s so well-balanced. It’s smooth. It’s sophisticated. If you were trying to get me between the sheets it would work. And if you were to offer me another I would definitely drink it, no questions asked.

Enough said.

BETWEEN THE SHEETS

INGREDIENTS

1 dash lemon juice (How much, exactly, is a dash? It’s defined as 1/8 teaspoon but we didn’t know that at the time and used 1/2 a teaspoon. It worked just fine.)

1 measure brandy (we used St Agnes VSOP brandy)

1 measure Cointreau

1 measure dark rum (we used Captain Morgan Original Spiced Gold rum)

Note: the book defines a measure as 45ml, but also points out it doesn’t matter what you use to measure spirits so long as you’re consistent. You could therefore use, say, a coffee-mug full of each spirit, but you’d want to have a spare liver and a surgeon on standby if you did. We don’t have these things handy so we wimped out and used 30mls of each spirit instead.

GLASS

Cocktail

METHOD 

Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

If you can open a bottle while some sexy sax plays on the cassette deck, you can make this drink.

WORD OF WARNING

Despite its name, if you/the person you’re trying to seduce with this suggestively named cocktail drink too many of these, the only action you’re likely to get between the sheets will be when you roll over with a groan to face the alarm clock the next day.

CREDIT WHERE CREDIT’S DUE

This recipe appears in Margaret Fulton’s Book of Cocktails & Party Drinks (Octopus Books, 1984). Sure, the recipes are actually by Joe Turner and it’s possible that Fulton’s name only got whacked on the cover because, in an eerie parallel to 1984, propaganda – sorry, branding – was more important than the truth, but hell, it’s a good book nonetheless. Joe Turner may not be a household name but his book doubtless sold lots of copies and for that – and this recipe, among others – he deserves kudos. Kudos, Joe Turner. Kudos.

Tagged , , , ,