Category Archives: sloe gin

Sloe down, Melonhead!

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One of life’s many little pleasures is being able to rattle off quotes from old-school Simpsons episodes (or Seinfeld, or whatever it was that you and your buddies practically memorised when you should have been studying for that all-important exam) that are immediately understood. To that end, some of you, I hope, will recognise the quote I’ve named this drink after – ‘Quit your daydreaming, melonhead!’ And if you don’t, that’s OK, too. Cause all you really need to recognise to enjoy this jammy, rich concoction is that sometimes in life, you need to slow down and enjoy the little things. Like quoting The Simpsons.

INGREDIENTS

90ml watermelon juice, strained

45 ml sloe gin

5ml vanilla vodka

10ml fresh lime juice

GLASS

Something that would blend in at a whimsical garden party held by the Mad Hatter. Failing that, a jam jar will do.

METHOD

Add all ingredients to a mixing glass that’s half-full of ice. Stir thoroughly to both combine and chill. Strain into the serving glass and relaaaaax.

RECIPE BY

This one’s by us. Enjoy!

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Cadenhead’s Charlie Chaplin

Cadenhead Charlie Chaplin

Last week, 52 Cocktails banged on about Cadenhead’s Sloe Gin. A while before that, we featured the Charlie Chaplin. And today, because we’re feeling really lazy, we’ve mashed the two together to create…ta da!…

CADENHEAD’S CHARLIE CHAPLIN

This is a modern variation on the classic Charlie Chaplin cocktail, which quite possibly makes it a whole new drink that deserves a much more imaginative title. Let us know if you think of one…we can’t be arsed.

INGREDIENTS

45ml Cadenhead’s sloe gin

15ml apricot brandy

15ml sugar syrup

10ml lime juice

GLASS

Cocktail glass

METHOD

Half-fill a cocktail shaker with ice. Add all ingredients and shake while thinking up a new name for this drink. Strain into the glass, pop the new name into the comments section below, and drink.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Thinking up a name for this cocktail is way, way harder than actually making it.

RECIPE BY

52 Cocktails

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Charlie Chaplin

Ever lost your voice while at a bar and had to mime your drink order? If you had to act out ‘Charlie Chaplin, please,’ you’d try to portray a sweet, slightly syrupy mixture with a well-rounded fruit base and a gentle citrus tang.

Or maybe you’d just point at the cocktail menu. Smartarse.

CHARLIE CHAPLIN

You know you’ve really made it when a cocktail gets named after you. This one is named after the slapstick comedian and mime artist who was at the height of his career during the silent film era, which was when this cocktail was invented at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria.

Charlie Chaplin

INGREDIENTS

45ml Sloe gin (I used Hayman’s but you can substitute another brand, such as Plymouth or McHenry)

15ml apricot brandy (homemade or store bought)

10ml fresh lime juice

GLASS

It should be a cocktail glass, but I used a goblet. If you don’t have either, a white wine glass will do (I can hear the purists among you screaming, but hey, not everyone has a cupboard full of stemware!)

METHOD

Half-fill a cocktail shaker with ice. Add ingredients and mime a bartender shaking a cocktail really, really well. Strain into the glass and serve.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Way, WAY easier than miming a cocktail order.

RECIPE BY

This version of the Charlie Chaplin is in The Cocktail Bible by Steve Quirk (New Holland Press, 2010).

ONE MORE THING…

Ooh, did you see that clue a few lines ago? No? It’s the bit that says ‘This version of the Charlie Chaplin’… The recipe above is the first Charlie Chaplin I made, and I liked it. So I replicated the recipe for you here. But while I was researching this post (yes, I do more research than just making and drinking cocktails) I found that it’s not the standard recipe. And I’ve found that to be the case for many of the cocktails I enjoy. Go to two bars and order the same cocktail, and chances are it will be made two different ways*; check the recipe in any two books and there’s a good chance the balance of ingredients will be different. Such is the case with the Charlie Chaplin. While this version has less apricot brandy and lime juice than sloe gin, the traditional recipe contains equal parts of all three. I haven’t made one that way yet – when I do, I’ll report back to you. Now that definitely counts as research…

*This also counts as research and I strongly recommend you do it.

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