Tag Archives: lime

El Diablo

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Devilishly easy to make and even easier to drink, El Diablo is a drink I put off making for a long time because (a) I bought some blackcurrant liqueur (Cassis) and then couldn’t remember which recipe I’d bought it for, so it sat forlornly in the fridge where it got mocked for being ‘adult Ribena’, and (b)I’m an idiot (see (a) for proof of this).

Then, while having lunch at Mamasita (a Mexican joint in Melbourne that, at the height of its fame, you had to queue for hours to get into), I tried this magical yet unlikely combination of blackcurrant liqueur, tequila and ginger beer and immediately knew I had to replicate it at home.

Mamasita’s looks way better than mine – they present theirs with half a spent lime shell filled with Cassis for you to add to the drink as you wish – but I think mine tastes just as good, and it’s less fiddly to serve. Lots of recipes call for a 2:1 ratio of tequila to Cassis (eg 60ml tequila and 30ml Cassis), but I found that was too blackcurrant-y, so I’ve adjusted the recipe a bit, going for a 3:1 ratio instead.

INGREDIENTS

45ml blanco tequila (we used Espolón)

15ml Cassis

lime wedge

ginger beer (we used Bundaberg)

GLASS

rocks

METHOD

Half-fill a rocks glass with ice. Add the tequila and cassis; squeeze the lime juice directly into the glass and drop the rind in, too. Top with ginger beer, stir gently and serve.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

Easier than selling your soul to Satan. Not that we’d know from experience, of course…
RECIPE BY

52 Cocktails adapted this one from a bunch of other recipes. You can adjust the tequila-to-Cassis ratio as you see fit, add more lime or serve it in a long glass with more ginger beer to make it suit your own satanic purposes!

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Memories of Summer

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Memories of Summer is so named because it tastes likes it was invented back in the good old days, when all kids had to play with were a couple of plastic dinosaurs and a vodka bottle. As the green dino is saying, it tastes of cinnamon, cherry blossoms and creamy soda; as the orange dino is thinking quietly to itself, if you can hear plastic dinosaurs talking you’ve had one drink too many.

Part of the appeal of this cocktail is that it can be made short and strong, or topped up with soda for a longer, more refreshing drink. Either way, it’ll help make your memories of summer good ones.

MEMORIES OF SUMMER

INGREDIENTS

30ml peach vodka (we used house-made, yellow-peach-infused vodka; if you don’t have any, then Absolut Apeach will do fine)

15ml St Germain elderflower liqueur

15ml sugar syrup

10ml lime juice

5 drops Bittercube Cherry-Bark Vanilla bitters

soda, to top up (optional)

GLASS

Tumblers are fine, though a short version of this drink would look better in a martini glass

METHOD

Half-fill a cocktail shaker with ice. Add all ingredients except the soda. Shake like you’ve just run through the sprinkler on a stinking hot day. Strain into the glass; top with soda if you want a long drink.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

The hardest part is making the peach vodka, as you have to let the fruit infuse for at least a month before using it. Can’t be arsed? Use store-bought, and perhaps garnish the glass with some peach slices so it at least looks like you made an effort.

RECIPE BY

Memories of Summer was proudly created by 52 Cocktails. The team would like to order a round at a bar just to see what happens, eg:

‘I’d like two Memories of Summer, please.’

‘Oh? Ah…well, we used to go to the beach…and sometimes we’d have barbecues…’

 

 

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Hendrick’s Mojito

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What’s fresh and sassy and always looks good? Apart from the 52 Cocktails crew, that is? I’ll give you a clue: they’re in the photo above. Yep, it’s The Fashionable Cocktail by Jane Rocca (Hardie Grant Books 2013), which contains the recipe for the mighty fine Hendrick’s Mojito. Gorgeously illustrated by Neryl Walker, this little tome is tres chic, dahling, and features a mix of new cocktails and updated classics. In my ongoing bid to convert some gin-hating friends into liking the sacred spirit (I know, I know, how are we even friends, right?), I hit em with the Hendrick’s Mojito and they loved it. You will too.

HENDRICK’S MOJITO

This is a refreshing, moreish drink, the kind that’s all too easy to knock back. Hendrick’s gin is made with cucumber and rose petals, giving it a softer flavour than other gin, and the cucumber flavour plays nicely with the mint in this drink. The original recipe calls for a Collins glass but I used rocks glasses to avoid diluting all the dee-lish flavours too much. Go with whatever version you think you’ll like best.

INGREDIENTS

45ml Hendrick’s gin

1/2 lime

20ml lime juice

15ml sugar syrup

mint leaves

soda

cucumber slice, to garnish (optional)

GLASS

Collins or rocks

METHOD

Muddle the lime half and about 10 mint leaves in the base of the glass. Don’t be too rough; you want to release the flavour, not pound them into oblivion. Add enough ice to fill the glass at least halfway. Add the Hendrick’s, lime juice and sugar syrup and stir. Top with soda. Garnish with a cucumber slice if you wish.

DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY

The hardest thing about making this drink is trying to resist making another 10 or so and devouring them all.

RECIPE BY

This recipe appears in The Fashionable Cocktail by Jane Rocca (Hardie Grant Books 2013).

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Aussie Aussie Aussie!

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A minty take on a classic lemon, lime and bitters, complete with a Big Pineapple and kitsch koala. Could it get more Aussie than this?

According to the good folks at Angostura, Australia is one of the world’s largest consumers of Angostura Bitters. This is partly because, although Australians have a well-earned reputation as big drinkers, the non-alcoholic lemon, lime & bitters is the go-to drink Down Under for designated drivers or those on a sobriety kick. (It’s possibly also partly because, until recently, you couldn’t easily buy any other types of bitters here). Apparently this refreshing drink is so Australian that if you order it another country, the bartender will just give you a blank look. And so it seemed like the perfect drink to serve at a party held in honour of an American friend who’d just received her Australian citizenship.

There was just one problem: it was non-alcoholic.

And, as a freshly minted Aussie, my friend was not.

And besides, Australian tradition dictates that you MUST drink at a party. Not drinking is unpatriotic – I’m sure that was in her citizenship oath. So I set out to put an alcoholic twist on the classic Aussie non-alcoholic drink – how very Australian.

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Lemon, lime and bitters is a classic Aussie combo. Here’s my take on it – with mint added to the mix, and the glass rimmed in Angostura sugar. 

First and foremost I wanted to play up our nation’s love of lemon, lime and bitters. I also wanted to create something with visual appeal. And so I created Angostura sugar by adding enough Angostura bitters to white sugar so that the sugar turned pink, then used it to rim a glass. Then I added a patriotic “green and gold” theme to the mix, muddling 10 mint leaves and half a lime (for the green component) along with lemon juice (gold) and sugar syrup, chucking in 60ml of white rum and topping the lot with soda.
Oddly enough it was reminiscent of a Moscow Mule, and probably would have been great with ginger beer instead of soda. (If you’ve never had one, a Moscow Mule is really easy to make: pour 45 ml vodka and 15 ml lime juice into a highball glass that’s half-full of ice and top up with ginger beer. It’s the drink credited with making vodka popular in the United States and is possibly called a Moscow Mule because it gives the drinker a bit of a kick. The 52 Cocktails house version uses half as much ginger beer and double the vodka, and is fondly known as a Russian Headfuck.)

But this minty, citrusy creation wasn’t what I was after and it certainly wasn’t very Angostura-heavy; it wasn’t a riff on a lemon, lime and bitters at all. So I went back to basics, making a lemon, lime and bitters in an Angostura-sugar-rimmed glass and adding a shot of vodka (because nothing’s more Aussie than trying to get your unsuspecting friends drunk with some alcohol that they can’t even taste).

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Lemon, lime and bitters in an Angostura-sugar-rimmed glass. Simple and refreshing.

Here’s how to make one:

First, run the rim of an old-fashioned glass over some lemon slices, then dip it in  Angostura sugar. Add a couple of big ice cubes, 20ml lime juice, 20ml lemon juice, 20ml sugar syrup, 4 dashes Angostura bitters (or more to taste) and 30-60ml vodka depending on how strong you want your drink. Give it a stir and top with soda. Yum.

It’s refreshing, easy to drink and easy to make; perfect for a hot Australian day.

Except that it was winter.

And so it was time to pull out the big guns – or at least, my Whip It! Cream Whipper.

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Ooh yeah baby. When a problem comes along, you must whip it.

Apparently these things are great for making whipped cream and desserts and mousse and things, but in 52 Cocktails Land it’s used for one thing and one thing only: making foams for cocktails. Yep, it was time to make lemon, lime and bitters foam, the easiest way I could think of to take the drink from summer to winter and from refreshing to elegant while possibly also getting egg whites to drip from my ceiling (as sometimes happens when I squirt the Whip It’s lever thingy too enthusiastically).

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First, I rimmed the glass. I like to place three slices of citrus (in this instance I used lemon) on a flat surface, place the rim of the glass on top and rotate it a few times.

IMG_3671Next, I made the Angostura sugar by adding enough bitters to white sugar to turn the sugar pink. (I initially used sugar cubes doused in bitters and mashed them up with a muddler, then added more white sugar and kept mixing it all up until I had the consistency I wanted: chunky enough to look good, but with enough fine sugar to really stick to the glass and carry the flavour.)
IMG_3672 Then I rotated the glass in the sugar a few times…IMG_3674 Et voila, an Angostura-sugar-rimmed glass.

Next I made the drink.

FOAM

Add one egg white, 15ml lemon juice, 15ml lime juice, 30ml sugar syrup and 4 dashes Angostura bitters to a cream whipper. Give it a shake and chill for an hour or longer (following the manufacturer’s instructions).

COCKTAIL

Add 20ml lemon juice, 20ml lime juice, 30ml sugar syrup, 4-6 dashes Angostura bitters and 50ml vodka to a cocktail shaker that’s half-full of ice. Shake it hard and strain into the glass, then add enough soda to half-fill the glass.

Top with the foam, following the manufacturer’s instructions on how to use the cream whipper to dispense foam without getting it all over your kitchen.

IMG_3678Sprinkle with more Angostura sugar and there you have it – a sophisticated, alcoholic take on a classic non-alcoholic Australian drink.

We really DO do things upside-down here!
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Baldilocks and the three Caipirinhas: a 52 Cocktails experiment

IMG_3656Once upon a time there was a man with no hair called Baldilocks who was also known as the 52 Cocktails’ CTO (Cocktail Tasting Officer). One day Baldilocks went out to gather flowers for his mother and came home with a big bunch of mint and some juicy limes. “I suck at picking flowers,” sighed Baldilocks. “And whatever am I going to do with all these limes?”

Just as Balidlocks began juicing limes by smashing them repeatedly into his forehead, 52 Cocktails’ CEO (Cocktail Experimentation Officer) came home. “I don’t know what to do with all this sugar,” she said, unpacking a bag of brown sugar (not the kind favoured by the Rolling Stones), a bag of caster sugar and a bag of organic rapadura sugar. “I met with a publishing company today who said they might be interested in turning 52 Cocktails into a cocktail book. They said they couldn’t pay much but that they’d try to sweeten the deal. I didn’t think they’d mean it literally!”

She turned to look at Baldilocks, who had a rather sour expression. “What’s that look for?” she asked.

“I can’t help it,” Baldilocks said. “All the lime juice keeps getting in my eyes.” He indicated the pile of citrus and mint on the bench, which rather conveniently was sitting next to a bottle of cachaca. This gave the CEO an idea.

“Oh Baldilocks,” the CEO sighed, “why don’t you out for a walk and when you come back I’ll have something smooth and juicy for you to slip into.”

Baldilocks left hastily, and while he was out the CEO prepared herself for a three-way.

A Caipirinha prepared three different ways, that is, in order to discover which one they liked best. What, were you expecting some kind of kinky sex story? This is 52 Cocktails, not 52 Cock Tales!

First she made her standard, tried-and-true Caipirinha, using a recipe she’d adapted from Shaken: 250 very sexy cocktails (Murdoch Books, 2004).


CAIPIRINHA (aka 52 Cocktails’ house Caipirinha)

Brazil’s national drink is simultaneously sweet, sour and strong. On a hot day, with a squirt of soda water and some mint added, it’s a refreshing thirst-quencher.

INGREDIENTS

6-8 mint leaves

1 lime, chopped in half, then each half into quarters

3 teaspoons caster sugar

15 ml sugar syrup

ice cubes

60ml cachaca (she used the Sagatiba brand)

30ml soda water

GLASS

Old-fashioned

METHOD

Muddle the mint, lime, sugar and sugar syrup in an old-fashioned glass. Add several ice cubes and the cachaca and stir until ice-cold. Top with soda water and serve.

NOTES

– The above recipe is for a 52 Cocktails house Caipirinha; true Caipirinhas are not usually made this way. The method given in the book is to muddle the lime, sugar and syrup in a cocktail shaker, add ice and cachaca, shake and strain into a chilled glass and garnish with a sprig of mint. Note that soda is not usually added if you’re using this method, and the mint is not muddled along with the lime. Try making one of each style and see which you prefer – let us know in the comments section below!

– If you are trying the 52 Cocktails house Caipirinha recipe, you can add more or less mint and more or less soda water, to taste. 52 Cocktails would usually add enough soda water to top up the glass.


Next, she made two Caipirinhas based on the recipe in The Craft of the Cocktail by the legendary Dale De Groff (Clarkson Potter, 2002), using brown sugar in one and rapadura (unrefined cane sugar with a caramelly flavour) in the other.


INGREDIENTS

6-8 mint leaves

1/2 lime, quartered

1 teaspoon brown/rapadura sugar

60ml cachaca

30ml soda water

GLASS

Old-fashioned

METHOD

Muddle the mint, lime and sugar in an old-fashioned glass. Add several ice cubes and the cachaca and stir until ice-cold. Top with soda water and serve.

NOTES

Dale De Groff’s recipe is quite different, but for the sake of the experiment 52 Cocktails had to make each drink using much the same ingredients and method. Dale’s recipe does not include mint or soda, and it uses brown sugar (not rapadura). His method is as follows:

Chill a rocks glass with cracked ice. Muddle the lime and syrup in a mixing glass and add the cachaca. Dump the ice from the rocks glass into the mixing glass and shake well. Pour the entire contents of the mixing glass into the rocks glass and serve.


Because this was turning into a scientific experiment that just happened to look like an excuse to drink three cocktails on a school night, the CEO labelled each drink using a very scientific method, ie by writing what type of sugar was in each drink on a rubber band and placing it around the relevant glass. “Genius!” she exclaimed. OK, OK, she might have had a few too taste tests along the way, but let’s not hold that against her.

When Baldilocks returned he found the three drinks lined up on the bench. First he tried the rapadura Caipirinha.

“Erk,” said Baldilocks eloquently. “Why is this so dry? Where’s the flavour I know and love?”

Next he tried the brown sugar Caipirinha.

“Ooh,” said Baldilocks. “It’s not as sweet as the house style Caipirinhas. But that allows the flavour of the cachaca to come through; that slightly petrol-y, slightly earthy, entirely delicious flavour. I like this one.”

Then he tried the house style Caipirinha.

“Oh!” said Baldilocks in shock. “I thought this would be my favourite, since it’s the one we always drink. But it’s so, SO sweet! It’s like drinking liquid lime icing! It’s delicious, but I can barely taste the cachaca and it makes my teeth hurt.”

He tried them all again before giving his final verdict.

“I like the brown sugar one best, though it could do with some more lime. It tastes like what a local would get in Brazil, whereas the house style one tastes like what the tourists would drink. The rapadura one is too dry and tastes sort of burnt.” He paused, thinking. “A drink that was in between the brown sugar one and the house Caipirinha would be really good,” he hinted subtly.

He tried them all again to be sure, even drinking the one he liked least, and then, not surprisingly, he need a little lie down. So he made his way into the bedroom – and in walked three bears. And not the kind from a fairy tale, either. Boy, was Baldilocks in for a surprise!

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